Vries, Roelof van
5.900 €

Oil on panel : 46,8 X 66,0 cm
Unsigned
Frame : 77,0 X 90,9 cm

(incl. our 20% profit percentage)


In short
 
Roelof van Vries is a typical exponent of Haarlem landscape painting. 
 
He was strongly influenced by the great Jacob van Ruisdael, who had given a sort of romanticised feeling to his compositions. Both artists actually moved the same year to the Dutch metropolis Amsterdam, in 1659.
 
About Roelof Jansz. van Vries
 
Dutch painter
Haarlem circa 1630/31 – 1681/1701 Amsterdam
 
Landscape painter.
 
His earliest dated painting is from 1651.
 
A painter named Roelandt van Vries joined the Painters’ Guild of Saint Luke in Leiden in 1653. It is not sure if this Roelandt is identical with our Roelof. 
Just a few years later, in 1657, our Roelof joined the Painters’ Guild in his native Haarlem.
He is finally documented in Amsterdam between 1659 and 1681. He got married here, aged 28, with a girl from Haarlem in 1659; the genre painter Reinier Hals, son of Frans Hals, was his witness.
 
Van Vries’ style of landscape painting is clearly typical of Haarlem and its major contemporary landscape specialist, Jacob van Ruisdael (circa 1628 – 1682) influenced him profoundly. According to some sources van Vries would have studied under Ruisdael, which is very improbable, seeing the fact that they both had more or less the same age.
Van Ruisdael gave a new direction to Dutch landscape painting, with naturalistic colours and a romanticised monumental feeling. 
His influence was huge. The following Dutch masters were also strongly influenced by him : Cornelis Decker, Gerrit van Hees, Claes Molenaer, Gillis and Salomon Rombouts.
Jacob van Ruisdael and Roelof van Vries both moved from Haarlem to Amsterdam in the same year: in 1659.
 
It is very probable that over the ages in certain paintings the initial “R” of van Vries and of both the Rombouts may have been converted into the Ruisdael monogram “JVR”(in one), so that today it is complicated to delimitate the authentic oeuvre of Jacob van Ruisdael.
 
Roelof van Vries was also influenced by Meinder Hobbema, by Jan Wynants and by Isaak van Ostade.
 
Van Vries occasionally used so-called staffage painters to paint the figures in his landscapes, such as Adriean van de Velde (circa 1636 – 1672)  and Johannes Lingelbach (1622 – 1674). 
 
Our painters’ latest signed and dated work is from 1681. The date of his death is unknown. He for sure died before 1702.
 
Why should you buy this painting?
 
Because it is a nice example of landscape painting in Haarlem, made under the influence of the great Jacob van Ruisdael.
Comparative paintings
Click photos for more details